FAQ – Osteopathy

 

Do I need a referral to see an osteopath?

The only times you will need a referral are if you wish to consult an Osteopath under Medicare’s Enhansed primary care program,. Otherwise you can simply contact an Osteopath directly.

Am I covered?

With the federal government initiative under Medicare Plus, patients with chronic conditions may be referred by their GP for osteopathic treatment under a Chronic Disease Management (CDM) plan.
Partial rebates are available for those members of Private Health Funds with ancillary or “extras” cover, but the amount of rebate and the conditions vary from insurer to insurer, so check the details of your policy.

What’s the difference between osteopaths, chiropractors and physiotherapists?

It’s not the role of any health professional to try to define what another health care professional is, and what they do. If you want a definition, it would be best to ask people in those professions. What we can do is tell you about the defining characteristics of Osteopathy, which are its underlying philosophy and its broad range of techniques.
While “Biomechanics” has become one of the most rapidly developing areas of medicine in recent years, Osteopathy was an early profession to incorporate biomechanical analysis of how injuries occur and what the secondary effects are likely to be. To take a simple example, if you go to an Osteopath with a knee injury, the Osteopath will do much more than just examine and treat your knee. They will want to know exactly how the injury occurred in order to assess not just which tissues in the knee are injured, but also whether there may be any involvement of other areas with a mechanical relationship to the knee, such as the foot, hip, low back and pelvis, and the associated soft tissues.
The plan will include attention not just to the joints and their associated soft tissues, but also to the blood supply to the affected areas, the lymphatic drainage, the nerve supply etc., in order to include all those factors which will affect the success of healing. It is this “whole body, multi-system” approach that has been the basis of Osteopathy’s success over the last century..

Is osteopathic treatment safe?

There’s no such thing as a form of medical treatment which is guaranteed 100% safe in every case. Even the painkillers you buy in the supermarket for a headache may cause severe side effects in some patients. That said, however, Osteopathy has one of the best safety records of any medically-related profession. Osteopaths are trained to recognise any condition that might make Osteopathic treatment inadvisable, and will refer patients for appropriate medical attention in such cases. Just as a Doctor regards safety as the most important factor in selecting the appropriate medication for a particular patient, so an Osteopath will also select the most appropriate style of treatment with safety as the prime consideration. Your osteopath will discuss with you any risk associated with particular treatment. This applies for pregnant women, babies, children, sportsmen, workmen, elderlies and many more

Do I need to bring in my x-rays and scans?

It is a good idea to bring these in. The more information the better!